The Hidden Zen of 192.168.1.1

192.168.1.1 is the IP address we use to refer to what is called the “default gateway.” Now that may sound like it has a ninjitsu-hmong-kung-fu-zen written all over it but really, it’s not what some people think. After reading the stuff here you will find yourself demystified about the different reserved IP ranges used as a router address.

So, what is 192.168.1.1?

You know what, when you first hear this series of numbers, you might think that it sounds like a great combination for your locker. Well, before you change it to that you might want to reconsider after going over the discussion below. For starters, everyone with a broadband router at home will be absolutely familiar with it. It’s the actually the most common IP address used for any DSL or broadband router.

You might ask, what in the world is an IP address? In simple terms, an IP address is a number series that is used to refer to a router, a website, or even a computer connected to a computer network or the Internet. When computers and other devices are interconnected there should be a way to identify which device is which, right? This is where IP addressing comes in – get it? It’s called an “address” just like your street address.

Every computer or device on the Internet should have its own IP address. Well, your computer doesn’t connect directly to the Internet. It actually connects to a local network or home network first. The network you use at home is managed by your router and it’s the router that connects to a larger network run by your Internet service provider, which also connects to a larger network, and so forth.

There are sets of addresses that are reserved for home networks or local networks. They are not used to identify websites. These are the IP ranges or set of IP addresses that are reserved and never to be used elsewhere: 192.168.0.0 to 192.168.255.255, 10.0.0.0 to 10.255.255.255, and 172.16.0.0 to 172.31.255.255.

Note that the 192.168.0.0 to 192.168.255.255 IP address range is reserved as the range for a router address. Come to think about it, 192.168.1.1 falls within that IP range. So this and other addresses that start with 192.168 that also falls within the said range mentioned here is reserved for use within local networking or home networking. These are the standards that are in place today.

Yes, it’s part of the many standards or standard rules used in computer networking. There’s really no special thing about that number series. It’s just a numbering convention or addressing convention. However, it’s a pretty choice since this series of numbers is very easy to recall. Many popular router models like Linksys use it. Nowadays, it’s just very easy to recall and anyone who has ever owned a router should know it as soon as they learn to mess around with their router settings.

Is It Important to Know Your Router Address?

The quick and easy answer is NO. You don’t really need to know your router’s IP address but there will be times when you have to. A lot of the networking devices that we use today like netbooks, laptops, iPhones, iPods, iPads, and Xbox, and other devices that have Internet capabilities connect to your router automatically.

The only time that you need to use it is when your router needs troubleshooting. There are times when your router fails to connect to the Internet. You may also need to use it to adjust some settings like when you need to add security features to the Wi-Fi network you’re running at home. Those are basically the only times you need to know about 192.168.1.1 and its many Zen features.

Charlie is a free lancer writer and content builder of http://www.tech-faq.com/ and he has written many useful genuine articles.